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HOMEPAGE GLOBE AND MAIL QUOTE New Globe and Mail article mentions this website! REPORT:   MEETING BETWEEN CBC AND NEW MUSIC CONTACTS AND LINKS
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Form letter from The League of Composers

CBC Radio revamp aimed at offices

BY GUY DIXON
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 2005
POSTED AT 3:41 AM EST
FROM TUESDAY'S GLOBE AND MAIL

Get ready to hear Madonna's new hit on CBC Radio One in the afternoons.

Radio One is revamping its afternoon programming starting Monday with more pop music and news
updates, and fewer long segments -- in short, less of what many might consider the traditional Radio One
sound.

"CBC Radio took a look at the whole afternoon period from 11 to 6 p.m.," said Jennifer McGuire,
executive director of programming at CBC Radio. A study was undertaken for the first time in a long
time, she noted, in order for CBC Radio to adapt to what it believes are listeners evolving afternoon
habits.

A call was then sent out via e-mail to CBC staff last spring to pitch ideas for a new anchor program to
replace The Roundup, while local drive-time shows were also extended to reflect the longer rush hours in
Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver. (Bill Richardson, a fixture on CBC Radio in the afternoon as the
long-time host of The Roundup, moved last year to the short-lived weekend Radio One show Bunny
Watson. Richardson still works at the CBC but doesn't currently have a show on the air.) Come Monday,
the sweeping afternoon changes might seem like an attempt to target younger listeners with lighter, slice-
of-life segments and fewer in-depth pieces. But that isn't the intention, McGuire said. It has more to do
with the CBC Radio's belief that people busy at work or stuck in traffic prefer shorter, livelier fare.

The new programming will kick off in the late morning, before local noon-hour shows, with host Jian
Ghomeshi's The National Playlist, which will feature musicians, actors and politicians debating their
favourite songs. Listeners will also be able to call in to kick songs off the continually evolving play list.
CBC is billing it as an iPod play list debated nationally every weekday.

Following local noon-hour shows across Canada, Radio One will then air perhaps the biggest change to
its tried-and-true sound: Freestyle, the new prerush-hour show broadcast nationally from Vancouver.
It will be co-hosted by Kelly Ryan, who is dramatically shifting gears from her previous investigative-
reporting and news work for CBC Radio. She describes the new show as a much-needed break from
years spent covering everything from the events of Sept. 11 to the Pickton murder investigation.

Alongside her will be Cameron Phillips, an actor who has spent the past four years freelancing for the
CBC. Producer Anna Bonokoski, who was with The Roundup, will continue on with Freestyle.
With a mix of 60-per-cent music and 40-per-cent talk, the emphasis will be on water-cooler stories, those
that people talk about, but which aren't considered hard news.

"What we found is that people . . . need a recess from all that information that CBC Radio gives them in
the morning and on their local noon shows," Ryan said.

"For example, in our pilot [program]," Phillips said, "we spoke to a man who had gone to a soap-opera
fantasy camp. We talked to a woman who was the silver medalist from the world rock-paper-scissors championship. This week, we talked to a man designing billboards for dogs: They are two feet high off
the ground."

Also, "we're playing lots of music. Music that doesn't normally make it on the CBC," such as Madonna,
Elton John and Top 40, Ryan added. "This is the kind of show you can have on in the background at
work, in the dentist office, moms at home. We're really hoping we can move into the work market, the
office market, retail..."

Next week, local afternoon drive-time shows in Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver will be expanded
from 3 until 6 p.m., with Canada at Five becoming two national newscasts at 4 and 5 p.m. and renamed
The World This Hour.

All of these changes were originally due to be launched the day after Labour Day, during the critical
radio ratings period. However, the nearly two-month-long lockout at the end of the summer pushed the
launch to Nov. 7.

HOMEPAGE GLOBE AND MAIL QUOTE New Globe and Mail article mentions this website! REPORT:   MEETING BETWEEN CBC AND NEW MUSIC CONTACTS AND LINKS
An example form letter #1
Form letter from The League of Composers